September302014

happymeishappylife:

4th Doctor: I don’t recognize this.
8th Doctor: It’s my version of the TARDIS’s control room.
4th Doctor: Really? Seems a trifle ostentatious to me.
8th: Doctor: I inherited it.
4th Doctor: Ugh from… Jules Verne?

I love it when The Doctor is disappointed with himself. He has such high hopes for each regeneration and then… no, no this won’t do at all. Why this? How can I have such terrible taste in… everything?!

10AM

ya-ssui:

I only watched this episode because there was Nightwing in it but then this happened. Holy shit.

Why would you do that?!

(via thepreciousthing)

10AM

pokeshipping:

On the topic of early trailers including unused footage: the trailer for “Spell of the Unown” apparently looked intense as well. I say “apparently” because I’ve never actually been able to find the video (if you happen to have it, I’d love to see it), but here’s a bunch of tiny grainy pictures I saved from somewhere forever ago. Is that Mewtwo?

I can’t honestly remember which version of this trailer I saw first, but the movie was intense regardless.  I remember seeing it in the theater with my mom (we were the only two in there, huzzah weekday matinee showings) and just kinda gaping half the time. I think content wise, other than maybe the eighth movie, this was the most emotionally raw of all of the feature length movies. 

(via thepreciousthing)

10AM

the keeper of the traken

What I love about this is how easily this could be 2 and Zoe. Adric was younger and less tactful, but he was honest  which The Doctor needed. Every once and a while he needed that reminder, “Doctor, Doctor you’ve stopped making sense again, and there are people who don’t know you as well that are terribly confused.”  

The heartbreaking thing is that 5 forgets this exchange. The relationship between 5 and Adric shifts drastically towards the worse because 5 just doesn’t have the patience and was possibly too muddled and banged around from a violent regeneration to remember this moment.

(Source: part2of3)

9AM

This is the crossover that doesn’t end….

Re-watched  Logopolis  and a few things jumped out at me that made me think Young Wizards:

1) Block Transfer Computation is essentially wizardry. It allows someone with the ability to comprehend it to amend physical laws, reality, and the movement of spacetime

2) Adric had the potential to be a wizard?? Which, if he did, potentially so did Zoe Heriot. 

3) The people of Logopolis were concerned with the problem of entropy and went about slowing it down by siphoning it directly into negative space. (Jury’s out on how ‘wizardly’ an act this is, though it’s entirely possible at the very least the E-Space Adric hails from is incredibly young, having only a few developed planets [one of which was colonized, rather than developed naturally by the Vampires)

4) In Young Wizard terms, The Lone Power had won a long time ago, and the Logopolian people were the last line of defense against the entropic death of their universe, which probably made the idea of just leeching the entropy elsewhere a bit of an easier decision than it would be otherwise. It also explains why things, in the end, tend to go rather badly for The Doctor and company. They win the battles, but overall they’ve lost the war and until Logopolis they weren’t even aware of it.  

(Honestly this is just an excuse to put Adric in Timeheart where he belongs. But wait, what if Earthshock was his Ordeal? Yes. Nothing will convince me otherwise. He passed, The Powers rescued him, and he’s been out there ever ever since. He’s the right age [roughly] to still be a rather powerful wizard. And he can find Zoe and they become partners and everything is beautiful and nothing hurts. Best fix-it! headcanon ever.)

September292014
3PM
2PM

On a Meeting of Minds

You know, it will forever bother me that Jamie is regarded as one of the “less intelligent” of The Doctor’s companions, even in canon because I feel like people are missing one of the primary points of his character, which is adaptability. It takes a unique sort of intelligence to be able to adapt as rapidly as Jamie-lord-badass-of-the-timestream-McCrimmon does, and I dare anyone to prove otherwise. We get a perfect broadcasting of that adaptability in his “it’s bigger on the inside” moment where he doesn’t so much focus on the supposed impossibility of what he’s seeing inside the TARDIS, but what might be waiting for him outside.  He’s accepted that what he can see and touch can’t be impossible because his senses—which he trusts more than anything— are telling him so. He knows he’ll probably never understand it, and that doesn’t bother him (not because he’s uncurious, it becomes obviously very quickly he isn’t) but because there are more important things to worry about like making sure The Doctor can get out of whatever mess he gets them into and being able to act for The Doctor when he finds himself unable or unwilling to. Jamie is usually the one pushing for action rather than deliberation and in the times it’s called for it’s very called for.  This is it’s own form of intelligence— the ability to recognize when someone is over-thinking or over analyzing a situation, which Troughton’s Doctor definitely has a habit of doing: he’s terrified of making the wrong decision, and Jamie is there to remind him that sometimes only time can tell what the outcome will really yield.  

The priority that Jamie puts towards technical knowledge and skill is unlike almost any other companion in that he’s very shrewd in what he deems important enough to learn— reading and writing are obviously mandatory, but “higher” concept skills are largely learned in the abstract if at all. Most of his attention tends to be focused on understanding the social aspects necessary to navigate the myriad of different cultures he encounters with The Doctor, a majority of which are frustrating in their otherness, but he does learn, even if he doesn’t always agree with what he learns.  And most of the time even if he doesn’t agree entirely, that doesn’t mean he won’t risk his own safety to see others don’t come to undue harm.  It’s that social and emotional intelligence The Doctor needs because half the time he doesn’t understand other people nearly as well as he thinks he does. Most of his problems arise from misjudging someone that Jamie had previously judged very differently from the Doctor.

It’s the very few times his ‘told you so’s’ carry any weight. 

There’s a lot of emphasis, especially after Zoe arrives that The Doctor is “better off” because he finally has someone he doesn’t need to talk down to, when it never seemed to me like he talked down to Jamie at all.  More than anything, it was obvious The Doctor understood why his companion chose to prioritize and learn the things he did, and accepted that he’d just have to make up for the things he didn’t.  The exchange between Jamie and The Doctor is one of social and emotional intelligence versus technical intelligence, one that is vital to not only their relationship but their very survival. .

September282014

So according to tv canon, between The Web of Fear and The Invasion is four years, standard time. 

Big Finish’s The Shadow of Death ballparks Jamie being with The Doctor for two or three years. 

Maybe it’s because so little of the Troughton years still exist, but it just feels so sparse—like at some point someone tried to pull a JM Barrie style cheat and just say: “they had enough adventures to fill a latin to english dictionary front to back,” without leaving us a single detail as to what those adventures were.

And so many of the lost episodes were incredibly ambitious scripts, with The Space Pirates and The Invasion  clocking in at six and eight parts each. Not to mention what would have been the practical demands of scripts like The Queen of Time, Prisoners in Space and Lords of the Red Planet.  

Jamie’s time will always feel incomplete, as will Zoe’s, and that’s in large part because the chemistry the actors had really made you believe they could do this forever.

In a way they have. 

1PM
sweaterkittensahoy:

One of the reasons I adore this book is how perfectly they handled Pete. Yeah, he’s sarcastic and quippy and ruthlessly business-minded, but he’s not an idiot, and you’re not gonna win a round of mind games with him.

I’m not gonna lie… I didn’t really like Peter much until this comic. We get to see him so much more fleshed out, using his brain instead of relying on guile and snark and genuinely caring and worrying about the people around him. The “pep talk” he gives before they face Tiamat for the first time is beautiful because he doesn’t pull any punches— they have newbies with them after all, and to not make absolutely sure they understand what they’re walking into would have been cruel. And then there’s the above scene; we know he’s worried about Dana, but he’s done screwing around, and he makes sure Tiamat knows that without really batting an eye—there’s no posturing here like there is in the first and second movies; he’s not grandstanding. This is a much, much more mature Peter Venkman. This is a Peter who knows when to cut the crap and get to business, and it gives him a fantastic sense of credibility that’s sometimes easy to forget he has.   

sweaterkittensahoy:

One of the reasons I adore this book is how perfectly they handled Pete. Yeah, he’s sarcastic and quippy and ruthlessly business-minded, but he’s not an idiot, and you’re not gonna win a round of mind games with him.

I’m not gonna lie… I didn’t really like Peter much until this comic. We get to see him so much more fleshed out, using his brain instead of relying on guile and snark and genuinely caring and worrying about the people around him. The “pep talk” he gives before they face Tiamat for the first time is beautiful because he doesn’t pull any punches— they have newbies with them after all, and to not make absolutely sure they understand what they’re walking into would have been cruel. And then there’s the above scene; we know he’s worried about Dana, but he’s done screwing around, and he makes sure Tiamat knows that without really batting an eye—there’s no posturing here like there is in the first and second movies; he’s not grandstanding. This is a much, much more mature Peter Venkman. This is a Peter who knows when to cut the crap and get to business, and it gives him a fantastic sense of credibility that’s sometimes easy to forget he has.   

12PM
modmad:

scienced:

So while I really enjoyed this comic by ModMad, the ending was killing me because it was just so darn depressing. Doodled this to make me feel a bit better and also because I love Grenda and her canon freakish strength.

THIS ONE
THIS ONE IS THE BEST ONE

This is canon now.

modmad:

scienced:

So while I really enjoyed this comic by ModMad, the ending was killing me because it was just so darn depressing. Doodled this to make me feel a bit better and also because I love Grenda and her canon freakish strength.

THIS ONE

THIS ONE IS THE BEST ONE

This is canon now.

(via d-hizzle)

10AM

As much as I love the allusions to the First Doctor and Susan in 12 and Clara, I hope after last night’s episode the writing moves beyond that— we’ve settled that he’s not her dad, she has no obligation to explain or justify herself to him as if he were, end of story. 

Also the whole inadequacy thing with Danny left an awful taste in my mouth, way too reminiscent of Mickey in the beginning only angrier. Can we please move away from the jealous black boyfriend thing?  I was happier with how it ended, but at the same time there was this part of me that went “oh so now we’re rehashing Barbara and Ian?” 

And while we’re at it, there’s something very skeevy and Freudian going on with all of these cold, matronly white women being Moffat’s go-to villainesses. 

I think someone’s complexes are showing.

September272014

tranxio:

Sometimes I look up at the moon and think

Dame Judi Dench plays Dungeons & Dragons

She was introduced to the game by Vin Diesel on the set of Chronicles of Riddick

And now she DMs for her granddaughter

This is our world

*sudden mental image of McGonagall, Harry, Hermione, and Ron playing D&D in the Gryffindor common room with magically animated figures and maps*

(via inquisiitor)

12PM

The Stalkers

roadsandkingdoms :

Inside the bizarre Subculture That L ives to Explore Chernobyl’s Dead Zone

image

Fantastic piece of journalism on Stalker culture, the history and legacy of the Chernobyl Disaster. 

September262014

originallonemagpie:

akahades:

raeseddon:

Sometimes I think about how Terry Nation desperately wanted a Blake’s 7/Dr. Who crossover episode and wonder why fandom or Big Finish hasn’t delivered on that yet.

Just think about all of the running around in corridors and quarries that could happen! 

(And on a more serious note, it would be really interesting to see The Doctor so desperate to stay uninvolved in Blake’s cause. He’d really not agree with his methods at all and they’d make really interesting foils.)

There are some out there:

There’s probably more out there, but this is what I could find.

Also, not Doctor Who, but there’s a big piece of meta here about a secret Star Wars crossover that’s worth a read.

Also, not Dr Who, but if you watch the Star Trek episode By Any Other Name, followed by the B7 episode Star One, they flow together amazingly well as original and sequel.

Thanks for the recs!

I still want a *canon* crossover though. Hahahaha

Because I mean really, they all still do stuff for Big Finish anyway.

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